When grammar and emotions step on their own toes…

There is something very troubling about the following.

Postulation- American Sign Language facial grammar has a seemingly inevitable activation of what are now confirmed to be known as Mirror Neurons. And this postulation lends to the further postulating of-we may be in a little bit of trouble…

Firstly- explore the idea of the Mirror Neuron and then explore its connection to American Sign Language facial grammar.

What is a Mirror Neuron?

According to WiseGeek.com, “mirror neurons are special neurons in the brain that underlie the experience of empathy, and also play a critical function in learning. What makes mirror neurons distinct is that they fire both when performing a certain action, and observing another person, especially of the same species, perform that action. So the neuroactivity is the same whether it’s you performing the action or another. Two locations in the brain where mirror neurons have been observed are the premotor cortex and the inferior parietal cortex. Mirror neurons are likely a common neurological feature of many if not all primates […]”

It’s almost easier to understand Empathy etymologically along with the other pathos, and these are the definitions that I will stick to when using them in this post.

  1. Empathy – Em Pathos means to be in, or get into, the feeling of someone else. In other words, “I understand and relate to how you feel so deeply and intuitively that I too feel this.”
  2. Sympathy – Sym Pathos means to be with the feeling of someone else. As if to say, “I can see what you are going through, I have been in similar situations, I may relate to your emotions this way.”
  3. Apathy – A Pathos means to be against (a) feelings (pathos). In other words, “I can not relate,” “I do not care to relate.
  4. Compassion – I feel needs to be a part of this because it is often confused, and used as a synonym for, sympathy when it may not be that at all. Com Passion etymologically means to come together and suffer.

In other words, I may smile because you have smiled. I have become empathetic to your emotion of happiness.

When you cry, I experience sadness because I have become, again, empathetic to your emotion.

This is something that is built into our evolution for a very specific purpose. A facial expression of disgust indicates a possible poison for example. And our mirror neurons tell us that that which has been ingested by our companion should not be ingested by us.

…and thus our empathy (that is our em pathos (in and into emotion)) tells us that that thing that disgust is being expressed towards is something that it would be wise for us to avoid.

A face of fear…


(Duchenne de Boulogne (1801 – 1875))

…will activate the mirror neurons of the same neuroactivity that tells us in the language of blood filling our thighs and legs to say, “run!”

We can even find the activation of mirror neurons through cross species interaction!

 (Evolution of Neonatal Imitation. Gross L, PLoS Biology Vol. 4/9/2006, e311)

Amazing no?

“A mirror neuron […] fires both when an animal acts and when the animal observes the same action performed by another. Thus, the neuron “mirrors” the behavior of the other, as though the observer were itself acting. Such neurons have been directly observed in primate[s] and other species including birds.” (Wikipedia contributors. “Mirror neuron.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 27 Apr. 2012. Web. 15 May. 2012.)

As I stated above, when you smile then I shall most likely do the same.

For further, enjoyable, understanding of what the mirror neuron is all about—please take the few minutes to watch one of my Neuroscientists, Vilayanur S. Ramachandran’s discussion on the subject.

Now that we have a basic understand of what mirror neurons are and what part they play in human empathy and what part they played in evolution—we next turn to Paul Ekman’s work.

Ekman’s revolutionary, “Facialencyclopedia,” the Facial Action Coding System  (FACS) has an alphanumerical code for each expression that the human face is capable of making. For example fear can be read as 1+2+4+5+20+26 while something as simple as happiness is 6+12.

Moreover, depending on the intensity of the emotion exhibited on the face a level of A through E is assigned to it. For example, when I wake up and it’s raining, I’m usually at a 6+12 but give me a nice 68 degree Saturday at my godson’s soccer game and I’m exhibited the facial expression, a FACS score of, 6D+12D. Does this make sense?

Now we have mirror neurons and we have the expressions that the human face is capable of making. And now that these two things are, hopefully, understood we are now led to the trouble of American Sign Language facial grammar.

William G. Vicars is a man that I refer to often when I am considering this idea as one to worry about. (No offense Mr. Vicars). If we visit his website LifePrint.com we find a myriad example and expressions of the faces that are the grammatically correct inflections to convey information through American Sign Langauge.

Now, American Sign Language, Taiwanese Sign Language, French Sign Language etc. have all, just as all spoken languages have, evolved naturally out of the human necessity to communicate with each other.

But what is something that stands as a barrier? In spoken languages we have vocal inflection, we have intonation. These indicate the severity or lack of severity of what we are speaking in a conversation. Now take a signed language and consider that there is no vocal inflection with which to intensify or mitigate your subject.

What then?

As the evolution of American Sign Language had it, the inflection has occurred, among other places, in the face and in the position of the body.

When a hearing individual expresses something that has an emotion attached to it- their face will indicate, properly, the felt emotion. As will a deaf persons face. There is no difference here.

Where we run into the difficulty is in a grammatical structure found present in, mainly, the forehead. And, accordingly, this is where we will now focus our attention.

Grammatically speaking when you are asking, in conversation, a “WH question,” (that is, who, what, where, when and why) your forehead furrows in such a way that it is, quite literally, a partial anger expression. The grammar shares part of the same FACS score as does the emotion of anger. Furthermore, when you are asking a, “Yes or No,” question your eyebrows raise in such a manner that resembles, FACS score as well, the emotion of surprise.

The FACS score for the emotion of Anger is 4: the brow lowerer (depressor glabellaedepressor superciliicorrugator supercilii), 5: the upper lid raiser (levator palpebrae superioris), 7: the lid tightener (orbicularis oculi (pars palpebralis)) and 23: the lip tightener (orbicularis oris). Anger is then written out in a FACS score, simply, as 4+5+7+23. And, as mentioned before, would have an assigned A-E depending on it’s intensity.

And what are all of these muscles? Well, here is a photoshop project that took me far too long to accomplish that will help with a quick reference.

When the emotion of anger is presented on a person’s face (fully, as a microexpression, as a partial expression) whom we are speaking with then the mirror neurons in our premotor cortex and the inferior parietal cortex are activated consequently forcing empathy that, thanks to eons of evolutionary conditioning, cause us to, in that moment, assume, assess and conclude our way to a solution of how to deal with the anger we are presented with. Many people fight back, many people are able to talk their way through it. The cycle of emotions is a whole other idea that fits into this, but I fear would make this post much longer than it already is.

Now that we understand the FACS score of the emotion of anger and the consequences that are manifested by our involuntary empathetic reactions we can move on to the FACS score for the grammatical features of a “WH” question.

And it is simply a 4.

Does this mean anything at all? What is the point?

Scenario 1- two deaf friends sit at a bar and one asks the other, “what did you do this morning?” Upon asking his friend he presents a FACS score of 4A and since the conversation is neutral and the two are at an emotional baseline an involuntary reaction of empathy towards a 4A is not noticeable, if it is even there at all. (As Ramachandran said, we do have self-correcting mechanisms that will inhibit this most times.) The end result in this scenario is nothing to worry about, it’s a normal inflection of the face, a grammatically correct means of asking a question etc.

Scenario 2- a deaf child has just failed a math test, knowing that his parents are strict about getting good grades he arrives home nervous. His mother simply asks him, “how was the math test?” And upon her face is a grammatically correct 4A FACS score. The end result then is what? The boy is already nervous and when we experience an emotion we are biologically inclined to search for experiences and stimuli that will further reinforce the emotional experience. The boys mirror neurons activate and he is empathetic to a FACS score of 4A which is simultaneously grammatically correct and a partial emotional expression.

Scenario 3- a deaf couple is arguing.

Scenario 4- a special needs deaf child is in crisis mode.

Etc.

(I once saw a student hit her teacher in the face after the teacher had asked her soothingly, “What happened this morning?” Later when the girl was being engaged in a “life space crisis intervention,” she admitted that she punched her teacher, “because of her stupid fucking facial expressions.”)

Here, for example, a series of eyebrows (mine and a few others) that are indicating either grammar or anger. Which are which? Can you tell easily?

If I were to explain the similarities of a “Yes or No” question and the facial expression of surprise I would only, at this point, be repeating myself.

At this point I find myself stuck to be honest. My research in this is limited to the idea stage.

How do I prove that this is a problem? How do I show that this is actually occurring?

I’ve written to Paul Ekman about this idea and he thanked me for my, “fascinating letter and observations,” and proceeded to give me a list of people to speak with regarding this research. After contacting one of those people, the Professor Emeritus of Psychology San Diego State University, she replied that my research was, “interesting and provocative,” but something she’d never considered. She too gave me more names of people to discuss this with.

As I am currently on this goose chase I am leaving off with a few questions.

Have I explained this properly? Is the idea coherent? What forms of research is suggested from this point forth? Agree? Disagree? Criticisms? Etc.

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3 thoughts on “When grammar and emotions step on their own toes…”

  1. That was really fascinating to read. I think definitely more research should happen in that area, and I’d personally like to see it conducted in terms of interactions (of variables, not people, though I suppose the former will require the latter). In “real life” we rarely ever see a mechanism acting in isolation. The role mirror neurons are playing as well as the interpretations of facial expressions –which, I would argue, are “chunked” into communication in ASL as a means of making language acquisition more efficient and are therefore not likely processed in a hierarchical manner–need to be looked at contextually. Mirror neurons will fire when we watch someone replace a spare tire, but not when we watch someone replace a spare tire on television. Thus, there’s something about being in the actual presence of an individual that communicates an all systems go type of signal to the neurons to fire away. I’m not sure that science has pinpointed what precisely these signals are, but I would venture a guess that there are multiple paths. In the case of the child who hit her teacher in the face, in that case I’d imagine we’re also looking at some issues with response inhibition, which is lodged in the prefrontal cortex, also the seat of executive functions such as planning, attention, set-shifting, etc. In the case of that child, we would be missing vital information to ignore the role of the PFC in favor of an examination that focuses solely on mirror neurons and the swiftness with which one can empathize via facial expression. Overall – yes. This needs to be looked into. Go figure it out and report back. 🙂

  2. Two things…. the FACS scoring system has not been normed on cultures (as far as I know) that use facial grammar as a means of communication. The grammatically correct “WH” face should not be registering anger if in fact, the individual is not angry so these measurements are not culturally normed, and therefore misleading. I would be curious to see the difference in a FACS score of a Deaf individual who is asking and angry “WH” question such as “What did you do with my car??” and a normal “WH” question such as “What are you doing this weekend?” I have a feeling the FACS system is ill equipped to handle the subtleties of such a complex facial grammar. Fluent ASL users are able to decipher which parts of the facial expression are registering emotion vs. grammar.
    Secondly, there is a vast difference between how children and adults process questions. “Motherese” is a common phenomenon in both ASL and English and the progression from incorrect forms to correct forms is identical in both. (This is in reference to scenarios 2 and 4 above) Small children do not process the grammatically correct “WH” ASL construction and misinterpret it as anger… therefore Deaf mothers often raise their eyebrows when asking these questions so as not to frighten the toddlers. Hearing mothers do the same thing by lilting their voice up even when it is not pragmatically correct to do so. This is of significant importance to Deaf teens in crisis, whose cognitive development may regress when in crisis. Perhaps with some of them, using the standard “WH” facial expression may escalate them unnecessarily, if unknowingly. This is if the teen is able to answer questions at all in their escalated emotional state. Questions forms are very different than commands, and knowing all of this, it might be better to ask simple yes/no questions that stem from 1) a raised, non-threatening eyebrow position, and 2) lesser cognitive processing demands on the teen. I’m not saying this would hold true for all the clients out there, but it is certainly something to consider. Their language fluency is also a major issue. If they are language delayed, they may have difficulties misreading subtle grammar differences when they aren’t in crisis, so when they ARE in crisis, this becomes next to impossible.
    Just food for thought….
    🙂
    Jen

    1. “FACS scoring system has not been normed on cultures (as far as I know) that use facial grammar as a means of communication.”

      – Correct, it has not been normed for this reason. The FACS is an objective encyclopedia of each possible combination of human expression on the face and, in some cases, parts of the neck (see also: platysma muscle.) It simply applies neutral numerical values to muscle contractions and an A-E intensity scale based on how flexed the muscle is. That’s all its purpose is.

      “The grammatically correct “WH” face should not be registering anger if in fact, the individual is not angry so these measurements are not culturally normed, and therefore misleading.”

      – Yes! Exactly! The WH face should not be registering anger. I am postulating that it may be doing so due to cognitive processes established over eons of evolution. I am postulating that, by no fault of either individual in the conversation, the person on the receiving end of a “WH” question will have an involuntary neural reaction of empathy to what they’ve unconsciously perceived as anger. In other words, the individual is, indeed, not angry and may be perceived in an opposite manner accidentally.

      “I would be curious to see the difference in a FACS score of a Deaf individual who is asking and angry “WH” question such as “What did you do with my car??” and a normal “WH” question such as “What are you doing this weekend?””

      -This would be a great experiment. I have some deaf friends who would be willing to do this for me. I can score their faces and, also, I can find video footage, easily, of deaf individuals on YouTube making a VLOG about something where they are expressing anger and do a FACS score on them as well. Thanks for this idea.

      “I have a feeling the FACS system is ill equipped to handle the subtleties of such a complex facial grammar. Fluent ASL users are able to decipher which parts of the facial expression are registering emotion vs. grammar.”

      – It might be indeed! I’ve been in very loose contact with Paul Ekman regarding this. He admits to having no knowledge of this and has given me the names and emails of people who I can talk to regarding it. So far I’ve contacted several PHDs who have led me to other people because they, too, have never thought of the idea. Though, I have to say, many of them are finding the idea interesting and worth exploring.

      “Secondly, there is a vast difference between how children and adults process questions. “Motherese” is a common phenomenon in both ASL and English and the progression from incorrect forms to correct forms is identical in both. (This is in reference to scenarios 2 and 4 above) Small children do not process the grammatically correct “WH” ASL construction and misinterpret it as anger… therefore Deaf mothers often raise their eyebrows when asking these questions so as not to frighten the toddlers.”

      -This is a great thing to know. Really. This is, if the research pans out in the way I think it will, where my suggestions will be geared towards. Motherese. A term I’ve never encountered and will happily familiarize myself with.

      “Hearing mothers do the same thing by lilting their voice up even when it is not pragmatically correct to do so. This is of significant importance to Deaf teens in crisis, whose cognitive development may regress when in crisis. Perhaps with some of them, using the standard “WH” facial expression may escalate them unnecessarily, if unknowingly. This is if the teen is able to answer questions at all in their escalated emotional state. Questions forms are very different than commands, and knowing all of this, it might be better to ask simple yes/no questions that stem from 1) a raised, non-threatening eyebrow position, and 2) lesser cognitive processing demands on the teen. I’m not saying this would hold true for all the clients out there, but it is certainly something to consider.”

      – You are taking the ideas right out of my head with this one.

      “Their language fluency is also a major issue. If they are language delayed, they may have difficulties misreading subtle grammar differences when they aren’t in crisis, so when they ARE in crisis, this becomes next to impossible.”

      – You know where I work… So… Yes… I agree.

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